Classification Talk:  Gary Baird
 
Gary was born in Windsor, ON, and was raised in a blended family as the oldest of 5 kids.  His Dad was a veteran and owned a sheet-metal fabrication company.  He met his wife Patricia in College, and after college, they ended up working the in the same company.  They travelled across Canada in 1974, then took a 3-month trip to Europe, then returned to Windsor and married in 1977.
 
He always dreamed of leaving the pollution of Windsor/Essex area, so did a job-hunting trip to BC seeking a rural location with ‘no traffic lights’.  Found opportunity in Okanagan at the Vernon Fruit Union, where he dropped off a resume and was hired as a grader-foreman with just a handshake (no contract!).  Gary and his wife spent their first winter in Oyama, and in 1979, purchased a home in OK Centre, where he lives today.
 
Gary’s wife started teaching chemistry out of the old army barracks.  He has 5 grandkids with 6th on the way.  His wife was diagnosed with cancer and passed in August of 2020 after 45 years of marriage.  He has since met Christine, who lost her husband around the same time, and is enjoying their time together.
 
Gary loved downhill skiing when he ‘still had his knees’, and now loves all outdoor hobbies including pickleball, golf and tennis.  He does a bit of speculating in real estate in the OK valley.  
 
He has spent more than 26 years enforcing safety rules around food manufacturing as an Officer under the Food and Drug Act.  He also did consultation with industry in this area around BC and the Yukon, and various health authorities.  He helped guide the management of risks associated with food-related allergens. 
 
During his talk, Gary gave some detailed information on how to risk-manage allergens, which we will invite him to expand on in the future!
 
Gary has been involved in many groups involved with the management of food-related allergies.  He has volunteered with CESO (Cdn. Exec. Services Org.) and locally he is involved with the OK Centre Greenspace plan and is a Charter member of Winfield Kinsmen Club. 
 
Gary retired in 2003 and has focused on community service since then.    He joined Kelowna Now, and then met Rich and decided to switch to our club and plans to continue focusing on community services. WELCOME TO OUR CLUB GARY! 
 
 
AT OUR MEETING ON FEB. 10TH 
 
Lots of Happy & Sad’s shared by our members!
 
Gary – Happy. Vacationing in Parksville. Went to Malahat Skywalk. Beautiful view. Saw a pod of killer whales. The Skywalk. 30$/35$. Well worth it. Sad. Daughter in law, who just had a baby, has a precancer tumour on pancreas. Awaiting news.
Ken – Happy. Road is starting to dry off! Finding where landscaping isn’t great. Still learning! Chipping into ice to let the water run-off.
Kathryn – Happy. Working with sister at horse rescue. Working with a horse who has bad behaviour – de-programming him! Sad. Has a dog turning 15. Went lame recently. Pain management needed. Just sad to watch her get old.
Sandy – Happy. 3 days up skiing.
Monica – Happy. Had a client, 86 years old, once said just after husband was lost: oh, I almost had him trained. Happy dollar – best home-based business nomination
Dan – Happy. Drinks for lobster crawl are procured! Also happy ‘cause staff have embraced the Save On Foods cards program. 100 cards ordered. Sad dollar? Stickers on 100s of cards! Happy/Sad – golf draft…
Margret – Happy. Son is legal worldwide!
Donna – Happy. Finished first round for application to UBC Okanagan!
Jean-Marc. Happy. Out of PJs today. Also, 1st AirBnB guest.
Ken – Happy – sale on higher value Save on Cards needed.
Rich – Happy. Big store up the road, 30% off booze up the road!
 
heartSherriff was Brenda    Valentine’s Day Themed heart
a.Who gets the most Valentine’s Day Cards? Teachers.
b.Who is Cupid’s Mother? Venus.
c.Why is the red rose symbolic of love? It was Venus’s favorite flower.
d.How much does the average man spend on Valentine’s Day? 130$ dollars!
e.What popular website was founded on Feb. 14th? YouTube.
f.Which internal organ was believed to cause love in medieval time? The liver.
g.What brain hormone is known as the love hormone? Oxytocin.
h.What is a signature rose? Single red rose with baby’s breath.
i.Valentines is the 2nd biggest card day, other than Mother’s Day.
 
Sandy reported that the PELMEWASH PIER PROJECT is now an official Lake Country project. So. It’s on the books! Hoping for the peer in 2023. We might want to write a grant for this. Project can’t commence until a grant is written. Might need to be written in Jan. of next year (2023) then maybe the project can start in July 2023. Project can’t start before the grant is secured. Some juggling might be needed. All agreed this was great news!
 
LOBSTER CRAWL UPDATE by Monica – 47 tickets left to sell! Amazing! Mostly women buying – mostly over 54 years old! 181 clicks on the links. Things are looking good – please let people know about this event!
 
Guest Speaker: Shara Bentley with the Public Guardian and Trustee of BC Part 1
 
It was obvious how much Shara loves her job and sharing what she does!
 
She has worked with high-risk youth in a helping profession working with the vulnerable. Now works with the Public Guardian and Trustee of BC.
The PGT provides protective services to vulnerable people, including people under 19, adults who require assistance, and deceased and missing peoples who have estates. 100 staff working with a person who is a PGT. 3 regional folks in the interior.
 
Adult Guardianship overview – it’s an act. Everyone in BC over 19 is assumed to be able to make decisions unless otherwise denoted. Having an Adult Guardianship act is important because it provides protection for people who can’t make decisions. The Adult Guardianship Act is comprised of 6 laws. They work together for decisions around health, finances, and well-being. The package of laws enshrines the right of adults to make their own decisions but provides framework to assist adults if they can’t make self-determining decisions. 
 
We look for the least intrusive means to work with an adult assuming adults to be capable of making decisions. We can look even at things like day-to-day banking. Commandeering, or appointing a commantee, is a LAST RESORT.  Adults always have the right to make their own decisions unless he demonstrates an inability to do so. Sometimes adults can be capable in one domain, but not in another, can make decisions about getting married but can’t make decisions around finances. There can be concerns about harming others or harming self. Regional consultants can assist in making this assessment through referrals that are made in each region. We get about 1400 referrals. We look at allegations of abuse, neglect, or self-neglect. These referrals come from many places: neighbours, doctors, bankers and can come from anywhere. We consult on any allegations of abuse or neglect, including self-neglect.
 
We can open a case if we have a belief that there is a problem. Before we can move forward with accounting, we can reach back up to 6 months. This happens all the time. There is a lot of confusion, with for instance Power of Attorneys. I can ask for investment information, information from landlords or doctors. We do have broader authority to get financial records such as bank statements. In emergency situations, our office can take steps to take swift action and we can protect assets. We can stop withdrawals from bank accounts. We can put in protective measures…like we can halt the sale of a property, we can place caveats on property sales or we can direct income.
 
Sometimes you can just see that there are changes. It’s not always about being forgetful, or just looking different. But there are usually signs. Just because someone has memory issues, is not a case for taking away power of decisions. There are lots of solutions. Co-bank accounts. Education about roles. But, sometimes there are no other options other than becoming a commantee.
 
CASE STUDY discussed: A banker notices that large cash withdrawals are being made by a local woman. The woman seems vague about the reasons. The banker calls the PGT. The PGT calls the health authority.
In general, I talk to people about their worries and make some decisions with them.

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Future Speaker Dates: 
Please advise Secretary (Kathryn) of any speaker suggestions or topics you might have 😊
 
Feb 17 – Shara Bentley Part 2
Feb 24 – NO MEETING – ALL HANDS ON DECK FOR LOBSTER CRAWL FEBRUARY 25TH
Feb 25:  LOBSTER CRAWL!!!
Feb 26: Members/guests Lobster Dinner 
Mar 3 – Donna Bourget classification talk
Mar 10 – Rae Stewart Regional Waste Reduction Office, RDCO Part 1:  BC’s Model, and ‘What Happens to all that stuff?” 
Mar 17 – Shelley Wood – Fiction-writing and/or medical journalism during a pandemic - Sarah
Mar 24 – Nancy Adams Classification talk
Mar 31 – 5th Thursday of the month - No morning meeting – CLUB EVENING SOCIAL at one of the wineries (Sandy)
April 7 – Isobel MacKenzie - Seniors’ Advocacy Office Part 1
April 14 – Tyler Dyck – Artisan Distillery of the Year (Cdn. Whiskey Awards) - Sarah
April 21 – Carol French - Classification talk 
April 28 – Red Cross – Anna Hunt-Binkley (Monika)
May 6 - Isobel MacKenzie - Seniors’ Advocacy Office Part 2