Posted by Jim Taylor on Jun 12, 2020
Sandy Wightman has a thing about curved lines. He can cut wood straight, but he’d rather make more interesting shapes.
 
Wightman is the incoming president of the Rotary Club of Lake Country. He read in the Rotarian, the magazine of Rotary International, about mini-libraries. When the club backed the idea of mini-libraries, he decided to make some with curved walls.
 
The idea behind the mini-libraries is community cooperation. When you see a book you like, take it – and leave a book for someone else. It’s a reciprocal arrangement. 
 
Also, in these Covid-19 days of mandatory self-distancing, you don’t have to wear a mask.
              
Rotary hopes to install mini-libraries scattered through Lake Country at strategic locations.
 
A work crew of local Rotary members installed first of these mini-libraries last week at the Lake Country Museum in Okanagan Centre.
The club would welcome suggestions for other locations where a local resident can keep an occasional eye on the library’s welfare.
 
Wightman laminates the curved sides out of solid wood, a skill he practiced in building birdhouses that look as if they belong in a cartoon strip.
 
“But the birds don’t seem to mind,” Wightman grins.  Neither do the books within the mini-libraries. But people do grin when they see them.
 
The mini-libraries are one of many different projects undertaken by Rotary for the betterment of the community.
 
Rotary took a leadership role in providing a permanent home for the Lake Country Food Bank, for example. Since then, its promotion of Save-On Gift Cards has provided over $24,000 in operating funds to the Food Bank – without costing the people who use the gift cards to buy groceries even a single cent.
 
Save-On Gift Cards are available by email, cards@lakecountryrotary.ca
 
Rotary has also helped WALC, the Walk Around Lake Country recreation group, build and maintain a network of trails –  especially near Peter Greer school and on Spion Kop mountain. In addition, it provides funding for about a dozen community organizations every year.
 
And until Covid-19 shut down larger gatherings, the Rotary food trailer was a familiar vendor at car shows, Canada Day celebrations, and the annual ArtWalk.